Working With Namibia To End AIDS

A social worker displays earrings and pendants made in Chennai, India November 28, 2007. [AP Photo]

About the Author: Wanda Nesbitt serves as U.S. Ambassador to Namibia.

Last week, we commemorated World AIDS Day around the globe. We remembered the friends, family, and strangers whose lives were cut short by AIDS. We also recognized those living with the disease: individuals who, because of medication and counseling, are enjoying life, raising families, and who continue to be productive members of their communities. Here in Namibia, the United States, through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), is working closely with the people and Government of Namibia to prevent new HIV infections, provide lifesaving HIV treatment to those who need it, and help put an end to AIDS in the country.

On November 29, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced… more »

World AIDS Day 2012: PEPFAR’s Blueprint for an AIDS-Free Generation

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton greets Florence Ngobeni-Allen, ambassador for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Nov. 29, 2012, during a ceremony in recognition of World AIDS Day, where she released the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Blueprint for Creating an AIDS- Free Generation. At right U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Eric P. Goosby. [AP Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator.

Success motivates action. All of us are much more willing to continue to invest in something that has produced results than in something that hasn’t.

As we approach World AIDS Day, we now have a tremendous track record of success from U.S. investments in fighting global AIDS. A decade ago, an HIV diagnosis in Africa was essentially a death sentence. Today, through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the American people support nearly 5.1 million people on antiretroviral treatment. That treatment is the difference between life and death, allowing people to continue to raise and provide for their families — and build their nations.

Seeking to build on this success, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called for PEPFAR to develop what she called a “Blueprint for an AIDS-Free Generation.” She asked us to provide the next Congress,… more »

The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Blueprint: Creating an AIDS-free Generation

Fact Sheet
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
November 29, 2012


“The goal of an AIDS-free generation may be ambitious, but it is possible with the knowledge and interventions we have right now. And that is something we’ve never been able to say without qualification before. Imagine what the world will look like when we succeed.”

- U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, November 8, 2011

Background

On November 8, 2011, Secretary Clinton declared that, for the first time in history, the world is at the point where an AIDS-free generation is in sight. And at the July 2012 International AIDS Conference, the Secretary called on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to produce a blueprint outlining how the United States will contribute to reaching this goal.

Secretary Clinton defined an AIDS-free generation as one where virtually no children are born with HIV; where, as these children become teenagers and adults, they are at far lower risk of becoming infected than they would be today; and where those who do acquire HIV have access to treatment that helps prevent them from developing AIDS and passing the virus on to others. Creating an AIDS-free generation is an ambitious, but reachable, goal—and now a policy imperative of the United States. MORE

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton To Unveil The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Blueprint: Creating an AIDS-free Generation

Notice to the Press
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
November 27, 2012


On Thursday November 29, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will commemorate World AIDS Day 2012 and unveil the PEPFAR Blueprint: Creating an AIDS-free Generation that provides a roadmap for how the U.S. government will work to help achieve an AIDS-free generation. Secretary Clinton will be joined by Ambassador Eric P. Goosby, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator. The event will take place at 10:30 am in the Benjamin Franklin Room at the Department of State.

Secretary Clinton will be joined by:

Ambassador Eric P. Goosby, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator
Michel Sidibe, UNAIDS Executive Director
Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, Chairperson of the African Union Commission
Florence Ngobeni-Allen, Ambassador for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation MORE

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers remarks at the 2012 International AIDS Conference at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on July 23, 2012.[Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer delivers a video message to the International AIDS Conference 2012 on women, girls, and gender equality. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Remarks at the 2012 International AIDS Conference

Remarks
Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Washington Convention Center
Washington, DC
July 23, 2012


Good morning, and – (applause) – now, what would an AIDS conference be without a little protesting? We understand that. (Applause.) Part of the reason we’ve come as far as we have is because so many people all over the world have not been satisfied that we have done enough. And I am here to set a goal for a generation that is free of AIDS. (Applause.) But first, let me say five words we have not been able to say for too long: “Welcome to the United States.” (Applause.) We are so pleased to have you all finally back here.

And I want to thank the leaders of the many countries who have joined us. I want to acknowledge my colleagues from the Administration and the Congress who have contributed so much to the fight against AIDS. But mostly, I want to salute all of the people who are here today who do the hard work that has given us the chance to stand here in 2012 and actually imagine a time when we will no longer be afflicted by this terrible epidemic and the great cost and suffering it has imposed for far too long. (Applause.) On behalf of all Americans, we thank you.

But I want to take a step back and think how far we have come since the last time this conference was held in the United States. It was in 1990 in San Francisco. Dr. Eric Goosby, who is now our Global AIDS Ambassador, ran a triage center there for all the HIV-positive people who became sick during the conference. They set up IV drug drips to rehydrate patients. They gave antibiotics to people with AIDS-related pneumonia. Many had to be hospitalized and a few died. MORE.