Civil Society, Democracy, and America’s Commitment to Asia and the Pacific

Dr. Tomicah Tillemann speaks with The Voice, Inc., a youth development NGO based in Papua New Guinea, November 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Tomicah Tillemann serves as the Secretary of State’s Senior Advisor for Civil Society and Emerging Democracies.

Our work to rebalance U.S. diplomacy in Asia goes beyond economic and security considerations. We are also committed to standing up for America’s values.

In mid-November, I was in the city of Hangzhou, China participating in a groundbreaking conference on the role of civil society in U.S. foreign policy. The meeting was organized by the Institute for American Studies at Zhejiang University, and it marked the first time scholars in China have ever come together to discuss why organizations outside of government are such an important feature of America’s global engagement.

Participants in the meeting included experts from Chinese universities, the Academy of Sciences, and leaders from American civil society organizations. Our Chinese colleagues arrived with a wide range of assumptions about how American civil society groups operate and the degree to which… more »

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in New York, New York on September 27, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in New York, New York on September 27, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs Mike Hammer to travel to Asia

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
September 7, 2012


Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs Mike Hammer will travel to Asia from September 10 to 15. He will visit Ulaanbaatar, Beijing, and Hong Kong.

Assistant Secretary Hammer will meet with government representatives to discuss ongoing media issues. He will also meet with members of the media, students, and NGOs to discuss American public diplomacy, press freedom, internet freedom and freedom of expression.

For further information, please contact Amanda Mansour at MansourAJ@state.gov or (202) 647-6088, or visit www.state.gov/p/eap.

Travel Diary: Secretary Clinton in China

Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, right, and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton shake hands after attending the press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China Sept. 5, 2012. [AP Photo]

More: Trip Page | Interactive Travel Map

In Beijing September 4-5, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton met with senior Chinese leaders. During remarks with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, Secretary Clinton said:

"…I am pleased to return to China for my fifth visit, I think, although I’ve lost track, as U.S. Secretary of State. I came on my very first trip in early 2009, and this has been part of our overarching engagement in Asia. And as Minister Yang just said, we have institutionalized a number of mechanisms for ongoing dialogue. Our Strategic and Economic Dialogue, our consultation on People-to-People Exchange, our Strategic Security Dialogue, our Asia… more »

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions during a joint press availability with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in Beijing, China on September 5, 2012. A text transcript can be found at http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2012/09/197343.htm.

Secretary Clinton Delivers Remarks Remarks With Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi

Remarks
Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Great Hall of the People
Beijing, China
September 5, 2012


SECRETARY CLINTON: Let me begin by thanking Foreign Minister Yang for his long commitment to strengthening the bonds between China and the United States. And we have had constructive and productive in-depth discussions last night for a number of hours and then again this morning with President Hu Jintao. I conveyed to President Hu Jintao the warm regards from President Obama.

I am pleased to return to China for my fifth visit, I think, although I’ve lost track, as U.S. Secretary of State. I came on my very first trip in early 2009, and this has been part of our overarching engagement in Asia. And as Minister Yang just said, we have institutionalized a number of mechanisms for ongoing dialogue. Our Strategic and Economic Dialogue, our consultation on People-to-People Exchange, our Strategic Security Dialogue, our Asia Pacific Consultation, our new Middle East Dialogue, and all the rest of our engagement really exemplifies how hard we are working at every level of our government to build habits of cooperation and to open channels of communication. We literally consult with each other almost on a daily basis about every consequential issue facing our nations and the world today.

As I have said before, our two nations are trying to do something that has never been done in history, which is to write a new answer to the question of what happens when an established power and a rising power meet. Both President Obama and I have said frequently that the United States welcomes the rise of a strong, prosperous, and peaceful China. We want China to continue to succeed in delivering economic opportunity to the Chinese people. That will, in turn, have a positive impact on the global economy. We want China to play a greater role in world affairs. That strengthens global stability, helps solve urgent challenges. And we are convinced that our two countries gain far more when we cooperate with one another than when we descend into an unhealthy competition. So we are committed to managing our differences effectively and expanding our cooperation wherever and whenever possible. MORE

Travel Diary: Secretary Clinton Travels to East Asia, the Pacific, and Russia

Secretary Clinton boards plane in Beirut, Lebanon, April 26, 2009. [State Department Photo]

More: Trip Page | Interactive Travel Map

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton travels to the Cook Islands, Indonesia, China, Timor-Leste, Brunei, and Russia, August 30-September 9.

In the Cook Islands on August 31, Secretary Clinton will attend the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) Post Forum Dialogue as part of our intensive engagement and ongoing collaboration with the Pacific Islands. Her visit will emphasize the depth and breadth of American engagement across economic, people to people, strategic, environmental, and security interests. The visit also represents a concerted effort to strengthen regional multilateral institutions, develop bilateral partnerships, and build on… more »

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s Travel to the Cook Islands, Indonesia, China, Timor-Leste, Brunei, and Russia

Press Statement
Victoria Nuland
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
August 28, 2012


Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton departs for the Cook Islands, Indonesia, China, Timor-Leste, Brunei, and Russia on August 30.

In the Cook Islands, Secretary Clinton will attend the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) Post Forum Dialogue on August 31 as part of our intensive engagement and ongoing collaboration with the Pacific Islands. Her visit will emphasize the depth and breadth of American engagement across economic, people to people, strategic, environmental, and security interests. The visit also represents a concerted effort to strengthen regional multilateral institutions, develop bilateral partnerships, and build on alliances – three core elements of U.S. strategy toward the Asia-Pacific. She will lead the highest-level U.S. interagency delegation in the 41-year history of the Forum with senior officials from the Departments of State, Defense, and Interior. More

The Hague Adoption Convention: In the Best Interests of the Child

Alison Dilworth, Adoption Division Chief for the Office of Children's Issues, visits children in Tianjin Orphanage in China. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Alison Dilworth serves as the Adoption Division Chief for the Office of Children’s Issues in the Bureau of Consular Affairs.

Lian, like many orphan children in China, is in an institution waiting for a loving, permanent home. His story, for me, is the epitome of my work these past two years in the Bureau of Consular Affairs’ Office of Children’s Issues, the Central Authority for the Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Hague Adoption Convention). Lian is protected and secure because of the laws and regulations that China implemented when they became a member of the Hague Adoption Convention. He will become part of a loving, permanent family, who will know all of the medical issues he faces and all of his history while in the care of the Chinese system before he joins them in the United States. His new family will be prepared to support… more »

U.S. Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor Michael Posner delivers remarks at the 17th U.S.-China Human Rights Dialogue at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. on July 25, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript]