Did you miss our Google+ Hangout on the fight against HIV/AIDS? Watch a replay of Ambassador Eric Goosby, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, discussing PEPFAR and the battle against HIV from the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC on June 20, 2013.

Stay tuned for the full video.

Ambassador Eric Goosby participates in a live Google+ Hangout on PEPFAR and the battle against HIV. 

Where are we in the global fight against AIDS? Find out in a live Google+ Hangout with Ambassador Eric Goosby on PEPFAR and the battle against HIV. Watch the hangout live today at 2:00 PM EDT on Google+ or YouTube.
Follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #AIDSFreeGen and submit your questions now on Google+ at http://goo.gl/AXZZC. 

Where are we in the global fight against AIDS? Find out in a live Google+ Hangout with Ambassador Eric Goosby on PEPFAR and the battle against HIV. Watch the hangout live today at 2:00 PM EDT on Google+ or YouTube.

Follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #AIDSFreeGen and submit your questions now on Google+ at http://goo.gl/AXZZC. 

Through PEPFAR Support, One Million Babies Born HIV-Free

At the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), we measure our progress with metrics that account for every program, dollar, and service received. While these indicators help us become more efficient and effective in the work we do, their significance pales when compared with the most important metric of all — a life saved. To save any life is a remarkable feat, but to spare a child from HIV is truly extraordinary.

That’s why Secretary Kerry’s June 18 announcement that a cumulative total of one million babies will have been born HIV-free this month due to direct PEPFAR support is so remarkable. One million babies born HIV-free. This achievement would have been unimaginable ten years ago when the U.S. Congress passed the legislation that created PEPFAR, yet today, we can celebrate this momentous milestone. MORE

Where are we in the global fight against AIDS? Find out in a live Google+ Hangout with Ambassador Eric Goosby on PEPFAR and the battle against HIV. Follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #AIDSFreeGen and submit your questions now on Google+ at http://goo.gl/AXZZC. Watch the hangout live on Thursday June 20 on Google+ or the State Dept Youtube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/statevideo.

Where are we in the global fight against AIDS? Find out in a live Google+ Hangout with Ambassador Eric Goosby on PEPFAR and the battle against HIV. Follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #AIDSFreeGen and submit your questions now on Google+ at http://goo.gl/AXZZC. Watch the hangout live on Thursday June 20 on Google+ or the State Dept Youtube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/statevideo.

Supporting Children Is Vital To Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation

Children stand depicting the ribbon, the symbol of AIDS, during a candlelight rally to mark World AIDS Orphans' Day organized in Gauhati, India, May 7, 2007. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and leads the Office of Global Health Diplomacy.

"There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children." — Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa

The impact of HIV and AIDS on children is devastating. To date, an estimated 16 million children have lost one or both parents due to AIDS, 90 percent of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. And despite dramatic advances in treatment this number is not yet declining . In addition, an estimated 3.4 million children under the age of 15 are living with HIV, and millions more children are made vulnerable due to chronically ill parents or the social and economic effects of living in communities with high HIV prevalence.

These numbers clearly demonstrate how vulnerable children are to the social, emotional, economic, and environmental effects that… more »

On the Road to an AIDS-Free Generation

In this April 4, 2012 photo, women affected by AIDS share stories of survival at the Reach Out clinic on the outskirts of Kampala, Uganda. The clinic receives money from the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and head of the Office of Global Health Diplomacy.

2012 was an extraordinary year.

As of September 30, 2012, PEPFAR directly supported lifesaving antiretroviral treatment (ART) for nearly 5.1 million people — a nearly three-fold increase since 2008. PEPFAR also supported drugs to prevent mother-to-child transmission for nearly 750,000 HIV-positive women in 2012 alone, allowing approximately 230,000 infants to be born HIV-free, and HIV testing and counseling for more than 46.5 million people over the same time period.

These are not just statistics but they represent lives saved, and hope renewed for millions of families and communities. A decade ago, almost no one in Africa was receiving treatment. Today, over 8 million men, women, and children in developing countries are on ART, with the vast majority of… more »

Strengthening Global Health By Elevating Diplomacy

An Indian child is administered polio vaccine in Kolkata, India, June 17, 2012. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator. Ambassador Goosby also leads the new Office of Global Health Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State.

I was honored to be asked by Secretary Clinton to lead the new Office of Global Health Diplomacy. I am proud to serve my country in this capacity while also remaining the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator. I am equally delighted that a skilled and seasoned diplomat like Ambassador Leslie Rowe has agreed to join me in establishing the new Global Health Diplomacy Office in the State Department. We have seen first-hand in countries around the world that America’s investments in global health not only improve and save lives, they build stronger families, communities and nations and contribute to economic growth. And stronger and more stable nations abroad mean a stronger and more stable America.

Increasingly, our investments are also enabling countries to build the health systems they need to provide care… more »

World AIDS Day 2012: PEPFAR’s Blueprint for an AIDS-Free Generation

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton greets Florence Ngobeni-Allen, ambassador for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Nov. 29, 2012, during a ceremony in recognition of World AIDS Day, where she released the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Blueprint for Creating an AIDS- Free Generation. At right U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Eric P. Goosby. [AP Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator.

Success motivates action. All of us are much more willing to continue to invest in something that has produced results than in something that hasn’t.

As we approach World AIDS Day, we now have a tremendous track record of success from U.S. investments in fighting global AIDS. A decade ago, an HIV diagnosis in Africa was essentially a death sentence. Today, through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the American people support nearly 5.1 million people on antiretroviral treatment. That treatment is the difference between life and death, allowing people to continue to raise and provide for their families — and build their nations.

Seeking to build on this success, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called for PEPFAR to develop what she called a “Blueprint for an AIDS-Free Generation.” She asked us to provide the next Congress,… more »

Secretary Clinton Recognizes Progress on Shared Responsibility for AIDS Response

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers remarks at the UNAIDS Shared Responsibility Event at the United Nations in New York, New York on September 26, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator.

Today at the United Nations General Assembly meeting in New York, Secretary Clinton spoke of the shared responsibility of the world to defeat HIV/AIDS. At an event organized by African Union President Yayi of Benin, she highlighted growing African leadership against the disease — an encouraging development as we pursue the goal of an AIDS-free generation.

Secretary Clinton saluted African countries that are leading the way in meeting this shared responsibility. Some examples:

· Namibia now funds 50 percent of its national AIDS response, and is paying and overseeing a growing number of health workers formerly supported by the United States through our PEPFAR program. 

· Under the Partnership Framework Implementation Plan it recently signed with the United… more »