Secretary Kerry was greeted by members of the South Korean honor guard in traditional military uniforms upon arrival in South Korea today for his second visit as Secretary of State.

Secretary Kerry was greeted by members of the South Korean honor guard in traditional military uniforms upon arrival in South Korea today for his second visit as Secretary of State.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with South Korean President Park Geun-hye at the Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, on April 12, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Hannah Bae serves as a Public Affairs Assistant at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, the Republic of Korea.

Here in Seoul, we are quite familiar with hosting U.S. Secretaries of State. South Korea is one of the United States’ closest allies, which means our two countries engage in a great deal of close cooperation and coordination. This year we celebrate “Sixty Years of Partnership and Shared Prosperity,” as we mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War Armistice, the U.S.-ROK Mutual Defense Treaty, and the launch of the American Chamber of Commerce in Korea, among other key events.

For this Secretary-level visit, however, there were a number of new variables. New Republic of Korea President Park Geun-hye, in office a few short months, was meeting new U.S. Secretary of State… more »

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is escorted by Moon Seoung-hyun, Deputy Director General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for North America, and accompanied by U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Sung Kim upon his arrival in Seoul, South Korea, on April 12, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Follow #SecKerry’s Travel to East Asia

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to deliver remarks on U.S. engagement in the Asian-Pacific region on April 14, 2013. [State Department image/ Public Domain]

Richard Buangan serves as Director of Digital Engagement at the U.S. Department of State.

Followers of @StateDept watched the State Department’s Twitter account surpass 500,000 followers this week, and also saw Secretary of State John Kerry wage a friendly bet with his Canadian counterpart, Foreign Minister John Baird, on whether the U.S. women’s team would beat Canada’s team in the women’s world hockey championship. The U.S. team won the game, and Foreign Minister Baird made good on the bet, offering Secretary Kerry a case of Canadian beer during the G-8 Foreign Ministers Meeting in London.

Secretary Kerry departed London today for East Asia, where he will visit the Republic of Korea, followed by travel to China and Japan. And, during his travel, you’ll discover more reasons to follow our websites and social media properties. First, we are pleased to announce our new U.S. Department of State Live webpage, where you’ll be able to watch the State Department’s daily press briefings, major speeches by the Secretary of State, and more. Tune in on Sunday, April 14 at approximately 8:30 p.m. EDT, when Secretary Kerry delivers remarks on U.S. engagement in the Asian-Pacific region. Our@StateDeptLive account will be tweeting the Secretary’s remarks live, and we’ll be releasing the latest photographs from his trip on FacebookFlickr, and Tumblr.

You can also follow @StateDept and @eAsiaMediaHub for more details on the Secretary’s travel and go to the websites of our embassies in the Republic of Korea,China, and Japan for more on U.S. diplomacy in the region.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers remarks with Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea Yun Byung-se after their meeting at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., on April 2, 2013.

Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies delivers remarks on North Korea at the Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea on January 23, 2013. A text transcript can be found at http://www.state.gov/p/eap/rls/rm/2013/01/203145.htm

Along the New Silk Road

The Amir Temur Museum in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, shown January 2002, houses information about Temur, the 14th century conqueror and Uzbek national hero, as well as exhibits on the history of Uzbekistan. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Siriana Nair serves as Senior Economic Officer in the Office of Regional Affairs in the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.

My journey on the road to Samarkand brings me to the Navoi International Airport and cargo facility, where I am met by airport executives who brief me and my colleagues on the joint venture cargo operation between Uzbekistan Airways and Korean Air. They give us a tour of the site, noting that Korea is Uzbekistan’s fourth largest trading partner, after Russia, China, and Kazakhstan. Trade with the United States, on the other hand, is a mere two percent of Uzbekistan’s total trade, highlighting the enormous potential for future growth. On the tour, I learn that weekly flights from New Delhi, Mumbai, Dhaka, and other South and East Asian cities use the facility for shipping their goods to Europe, Russia, and the Middle East — a very modern incarnation of the ancient Silk Road.… more »

Assistant Secretary Kurt Campbell Travels to San Francisco, Tokyo, and Seoul October 23-27

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
October 23, 2012


Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell will travel to San Francisco, Tokyo, and Seoul October 23-27.

Assistant Secretary Campbell will host Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Cui Tiankai for the fourth U.S.-China Asia-Pacific Consultations in San Francisco on October 23.

Assistant Secretary Campbell will travel to Tokyo October 24 and will meet with Japanese Vice Foreign Minister Chikao Kawai and other senior officials October 25-26 to discuss bilateral issues and U.S.-Japan coordination on regional and global issues such as Burma, Iran, and Syria.

Assistant Secretary Campbell will continue to Seoul October 26-27 to meet with Republic of Korea Deputy Foreign Minister Kim Kyou-Hyun and other senior officials to continue our close consultation and coordination on the broad range issues of importance to our alliance, including the DPRK, economic issues, and regional cooperation.

Assistant Secretary Campbell will return to Washington, DC, October 27.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba and Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City, September 28, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba and Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City, September 28, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Anniversary of the Trinity Test and the Dawn of the Atomic Age

Trinity test image, showing that sixteen milliseconds after the bomb exploded, the mushroom cloud had already taken shape, July 16, 1945. [Image courtesy U.S. Department of Energy and the Los Alamos National Laboratories]

About the Author: Blake Narendra serves in the Bureau of Arms Control Verification and Compliance (AVC).

The United States conducted the world’s first nuclear explosive test, codenamed “Trinity,” 67 years ago this month in the southern New Mexico desert. The atomic age was born.

The former Soviet Union conducted a test of its own nuclear device four years later, sparking an arms race that saw more than 2,000 nuclear explosive tests in the decades to follow.

The Trinity Test had an explosive yield of 10 kilotons (releasing an energy equivalent of 10,000 metric tons of dynamite). The test was literally an earthshaking feat in the fields of science and technology, but also a sobering moment for those involved. It ushered in nearly two decades of further atmospheric testing of nuclear devices.

"[It was] an awesome and foul display," Harvard Physicist and Trinity Test Director Kenneth Bainbridge said.

In the years since 1945, thinking… more »