U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Brazilian Foreign Minister Antonio de Aguiar Patriota at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. on October 24, 2012.

Joint Statement from the Fourth U.S.-Brazil Global Partnership Dialogue

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
October 24, 2012


Below is the text of a joint statement issued following the fourth meeting of the U.S.-Brazil Global Partnership Dialogue.

Begin text:

On October 24, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Minister of External Relations Antonio de Aguiar Patriota conducted the fourth meeting of the United States - Brazil Global Partnership Dialogue (GPD) in Washington, D.C. The GPD was first established in 2010 and elevated to the presidential level by President Barack Obama and President Dilma Rousseff in March 2011. This meeting was preceded by senior-level regional consultations on Africa, Asia and Pacific, South Asia, and the Middle East.

Secretary Clinton and Minister Patriota stressed the important role the GPD has played in strengthening cooperation between our two countries, and reaffirmed the joint commitment to form a U.S.-Brazil Partnership for the 21st Century between the governments and peoples of the two nations. The GPD provides a forum through which our countries work together to promote cooperation and dialogue on a broad range of bilateral, regional, and multilateral issues.

The participants expressed satisfaction with the progress under the GPD since the last ministerial on April 16, 2012 in Brasilia. Consultations have been held on the Middle East and Asia that complement dialogues on Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean; economic and commercial issues; science, technology, innovation, and the environment; internet communication and cyber-related issues; and education, culture, and social inclusion. These consultations will continue to facilitate understanding and cooperation between our two countries. MORE

Championing for Change Against Global Hunger

Women dance and sing in welcome during the visit of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, not pictured, to the Lumbadzi Milk Bulking Group, a food security program in Lilongwe, Malawi, on Aug. 5, 2012, during the first visit to Malawi by any U.S. Secretary of State. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Tjada McKenna serves as Deputy Coordinator for Development for Feed the Future.

A week ago, against the backdrop of the Olympics, I witnessed history. I was there not for the Games, but for the Global Hunger Event, which was co-hosted by U.K. Prime Minister Cameron and Brazil Vice President Temer. The event brought civil society and private sector partners together with leaders from across the globe — and even a few Olympic heroes including incomparable Mo Farah — to commit to championing for change against global hunger.

At the top of the list of priorities that emerged: Making significant gains against undernutrition before the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Just as is true for Olympians to be at their best, we know that… more »

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton poses for a photo with Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil during Rio+20 Conference on June 22, 2012. [Photo courtesy of Walter Mesquita]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton poses for a photo with Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil during Rio+20 Conference on June 22, 2012. [Photo courtesy of Walter Mesquita]

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton Delivers Remarks at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development Plenary in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil on June 22, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Secretary Clinton addressed the plenary meeting at Rio+20, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A transcript and video will be posted when available. For more updates go to: http://www.state.gov/index.htm

Secretary Clinton addressed the plenary meeting at Rio+20, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A transcript and video will be posted when available. For more updates go to: http://www.state.gov/index.htm

Astronauts Oleg Kononenko, of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Joseph Acaba of NASA, and Andre Kuipers of the European Space Agency deliver a message from the International Space Station to the Rio+20 Conference taking place in Brazil, June 2012.

Special Envoy for Climate Change Todd Stern at Rio+20

Special Briefing
Todd Stern
Special Envoy for Climate Change
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


SPECIAL ENVOY STERN: Hi everybody and welcome. I’m just going to make a few quick opening remarks. And we are obviously still in the middle of this overall process. We did finish today on a so-called ad ref basis, an agreement among this level, the negotiating level of the conference on the text that has been under discussion for quite some time now.

First of all, I would like to thank the Brazilians for hosting this conference and for the enormous amount of work that they have done. I said in the plenary today, and I mean it, the Brazilian diplomatic team is an extraordinarily talented group. I figured that out in 1997 at my first international conference. They were good then, and they are even better now. And I’ve had the pleasure to work and privilege of working with them in a lot of contexts now over the last several years. And even when it is tough, they are great people to work with.

And just one other preliminary point, which is that sustainable development means a lot to the United States. The President and Secretary Clinton elevated development to one of the three pillars of U.S. national security policy, along with diplomacy and defense. It has been an important issue. We’ve put a lot of time, effort and money into it. And we care a lot about getting sustainable development right. And we do believe that sustainable development is really nothing more than development itself in the 21st century at a time when the pressure on resources, on food and water, and oceans, and many other things just becomes greater and greater with growing economies and growing population. MORE.

A panel participant discusses actions the United States is taking to secure a sustainable future at the U.S. Center at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) is shown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 17, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

A panel participant discusses actions the United States is taking to secure a sustainable future at the U.S. Center at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) is shown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 17, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Rio+20: U.S. Center Opens at UN Conference on Sustainable Development

The statue of Christ the Redeemer is seen with Sugar Loaf mountain in the background in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 1, 2010.[AP File Photo]

About the Author: Lynette Evans serves as a Program Officer in the Bureau of International Information Programs.

Last week, I joined thousands of people from around the world to participate in the opening of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development here in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

On June 13, President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil kicked off the conference, where she called on “all countries of the world to commit” to reaching an accord that addresses serious environmental and social woes. While world leaders and stakeholders groups are busy negotiating, the public also has the opportunity to become involved and learn more about issues of sustainable development ranging from technology and innovation to governance and partnership initiatives at Athlete’s Park, a venue where governments, businesses, and organizations are hosting a variety of side events.
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