An Outsized Problem With a Small-Sized Solution

More than 73% Burundi’s population is undernourished, and 58% is stunted.

Learn how USAID is using RUTF or Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food to treat acute malnutrition on DipNote.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers opening remarks at the 2012 African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Forum to mark Global Economic Statecraft Day at the U.S. Department if State in Washington, D.C. on June 14, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers opening remarks at the 2012 African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Forum to mark Global Economic Statecraft Day at the U.S. Department if State in Washington, D.C. on June 14, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers opening remarks at the 2012 African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Forum to mark Global Economic Statecraft Day at the U.S. Department if State in Washington, D.C. on June 14, 2012. A text transcript can be found at http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2012/06/192327.htm.

Enhancing Africa’s Infrastructure for Trade

Busy neighborhood street in Accra, Ghana July 10, 2009 [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Paul Marin serves as the Regional Director for Sub-Saharan Africa at the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA), where he is responsible for developing the agency’s strategies and assistance activities throughout the region.

This week, I have the honor of participating in the African Growth and Opportunity Act Trade and Economic Cooperation Forum (AGOA Forum). The theme of the Forum is “Enhancing Africa’s Infrastructure for Trade,” and it’s one that we know very well at the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) — it describes what we have been doing in sub-Saharan Africa for over three decades.

Specifically, USTDA helps enhance sub-Saharan Africa’s infrastructure for trade and economic growth by facilitating the participation of U.S. businesses through public-private partnerships in the planning and execution of priority development projects in host countries. Our objectives are to match U.S. technological… more »

Burundi Takes on Marking Small Arms After Successfully Clearing Landmines

Peacekeepers of the U.N. mission in Burundi prepare to destroy assault rifles, guns, grenades, mortars, mines and ammunition, pictured, on Dec. 27, 2005 on the outskirts of the capital Bujumbura. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Katie Smith serves as an Assistant Program Manager in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement.

In November 2011, the government of Burundi reached a major milestone in its recovery from decades of civil war with the announcement that their country had reached “landmine-free” status. Now, with the help of the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/WRA) in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Burundi has embarked on a new initiative to build on these gains by improving security of its military and police forces’ inventories of small arms and light weapons, such as assault rifles and pistols.

Since 2006, the United States has invested approximately $2.7 million in assistance for weapons stockpile security training, the destruction of 9,000 of its excess weapons, and destruction of 75 tons of its obsolete and excess ammunition in Burundi. This also included… more »