Special Citizenship Ceremony for Adopted Children

Notice to the Press
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
November 7, 2012


In recognition of National Adoption Month, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano will host a Special Citizenship Ceremony for Adopted Children at the George C. Marshall Center at the Department of State on November 8, 2012 at 10:15 a.m.

This event will congratulate recently adopted children on becoming citizens of the United States and recognize the decision of their parents to build their families through intercountry adoption.

This event will also highlight the role of the Department of State and Department of Homeland Security in ensuring an ethical and transparent intercountry adoption process. In addition to Secretaries Clinton and Napolitano, senior officials from the Bureau of Consular Affairs and United States Citizenship and Immigration Services will be present.

Both Secretaries will deliver brief remarks and present Certificates of Citizenship at the event.

This event is open to the press. To confirm your attendance, please contact the Bureau of Consular Affairs press office atCAPRESSREQUESTS@state.gov.

Pre-set time for cameras: 9:00 a.m. from the 21st Entrance Lobby. 
Final access for journalists and still photographers: 9:45 a.m. from the 21st Entrance Lobby.

Media representatives may attend this event upon presentation of one of the following: (1) A U.S. Government-issued identification card (Department of State, White House, Congress, Department of Defense or Foreign Press Center), (2) a media-issued photo identification card, or (3) a letter from their employer on letterhead verifying their employment as a journalist, accompanied by an official photo identification card (driver’s license, passport).

Helping Refugee Children in Kenya

FilmAid runs SGBV awareness class in action, Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Anne C. Richard serves as Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration

It is hard to be a refugee, but I think it must be even more difficult to be a refugee child, trying to learn and grow and enjoy childhood despite living in some of the most challenging circumstances on earth. On a trip to Kenya, I visited with refugee children in two very different locations: in the Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya and in a safe house in Nairobi for girls who are victims of violence.

In the large (103,000 inhabitants and growing) Kakuma Camp that shelters refugees from Somalia, South Sudan and other nearby countries, aid workers grapple with a big problem: there is little respect for the rights of children. Many children are forced to work, others are neglected or expected to raise little siblings and some suffer from other forms of exploitation. Too many have been orphaned or separated from their parents. Nearly all the children live precarious… more »

RT @StateDept Special Advisor for @ChildrensIssues Susan Jacobs travels to Guatemala, July 1-3: http://go.usa.gov/w4K
Helping Children Around the World Come Home
Ambassador Susan Jacobs meets with Brazilian Central Authority officials on May 19, 2011.

About the Author: Ambassador Susan S. Jacobs serves as Special Advisor on Children’s Issues at the U.S. Department of State.

National Missing Children’s Day on May 25 provides an opportunity to reflect on how the United States government works to prevent international parental child abduction. Secretary Clinton recorded a message to commemorate National Missing Children’s Day and the Department(tm)s other efforts to assist families in cases of international parental child abduction. You may view it here.

As Special Advisor for Children’s Issues, I engage with foreign government officials on the issues of intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction. I strive to protect the welfare and interests of children by increasing the number of abducted children returned to their parents, strengthening legal safeguards and developing international relationships to resolve current abduction cases and prevent future… more