We told these American college students studying in Israel that they’d be speaking to the State Department spokesperson at their seminar… Surprise! Secretary Kerry stopped by for a chat as well.

We told these American college students studying in Israel that they’d be speaking to the State Department spokesperson at their seminar… Surprise! Secretary Kerry stopped by for a chat as well.

This is our demand, our request to all the responsible people – that instead of sending weapons, instead of sending tanks to Afghanistan and all these countries that are suffering from terrorism, send books. Instead of sending tanks, send pens. Instead of sending soldiers, send teachers. This is the only way we can fight for education.

Education activist Malala Yousafzai at today’s #UNGA event on Global Education First.

For more on the event see here.

(via united-nations)

united-nations:

All children have a right to safe schools!
SHARE this UNICEF image and find out more here: http://uni.cf/endviolence ‪#‎ENDviolence‬

united-nations:

All children have a right to safe schools!

SHARE this UNICEF image and find out more here: http://uni.cf/endviolence ‪#‎ENDviolence‬

On July 12 — less than a year after she was shot by the Taliban for her strong voice in this fight — Malala Yousafzai will mark her 16th birthday by delivering the highest leadership of the UN a set of education demands written by youth, for youth, to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.
united-nations:

Tell your friends and family that you stand with Malala, the young Pakistani champion for universal education and girls’ rights. We want to see your photos, vines and Instagram videos. Tag them ‎#MalalaDay and we’ll feature them on our social media platforms next week.
Here is one to get you started: http://vine.co/v/hauYOZm1Ttt
Sign and share her petition for education today: http://www.aworldatschool.org/malaladay
Image credit: A World At School

On July 12 — less than a year after she was shot by the Taliban for her strong voice in this fight — Malala Yousafzai will mark her 16th birthday by delivering the highest leadership of the UN a set of education demands written by youth, for youth, to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

united-nations:

Tell your friends and family that you stand with Malala, the young Pakistani champion for universal education and girls’ rights. We want to see your photos, vines and Instagram videos. Tag them ‎#MalalaDay and we’ll feature them on our social media platforms next week.

Here is one to get you started: http://vine.co/v/hauYOZm1Ttt

Sign and share her petition for education today: http://www.aworldatschool.org/malaladay

Image credit: A World At School

The Power of English Learning
 

Throughout my travels as an Under Secretary, I have been constantly reminded of the magnetism of English language learning.

From Ethiopia to Istanbul, from Lahore to Tokyo, the young people I have met who study English have been eager to demonstrate their skills. High school students in Ukraine sang songs to me in English. College students in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia, asked me to read their English essays.  In the Dominican Republic, young people proudly showed their handiness at playing “Trace Effects,” our online English-learning videogame. And in these upturned faces, I also saw growing self-belief and excitement about new possibilities ahead. MORE

Inclusive Public School Offers American English Language Training in Ukraine

Access Micro-Scholarship students at the Obolon Center in Kyiv, Ukraine expressed gratitude to Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Tara Sonenshine for the opportunity to study English through U.S. Department of State programming, April 11, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Tara D. Sonenshine serves as Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs.

In a public school in Ukraine, the State Department’s longtime efforts to support the human rights, dignity, and inclusion of all people was in clear evidence.

Located in the Kyiv district of Obolon, School #168 is the only school in the area where physically disabled children are integrated into regular classrooms. With help from State Department funding, the school offers intensive English language training, and integrates American culture and civic engagement as part of its enhancement activities.

At my recent visit there, students — with and without disabilities — greeted me in traditional Ukrainian costume. They presented decorated Ukrainian bread, and sang a local welcoming song. They ushered me through… more »

Creating Bright Futures Through English Teaching

English-language educators use English Teaching Forum at a training session in Ga-Kgapane, South Africa. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Marti Estell serves as Director of the Office of English Language Programs in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

From Algiers to Zimbabwe, we hear how people want to learn English. Children in orphanages in Mali, law enforcement professionals in Indonesia, and women entrepreneurs in Pakistan all share an interest in speaking English. Here at the State Department, we understand how English fluency lets people take charge of their futures: it builds leaders who can do their part to promote more prosperous, equitable, and stable societies.

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) is helping millions of people around the world create brighter futures by providing access and improving the quality of English learning. We support teachers and learners because English proficiency opens doors to new economic, cultural, and educational opportunities. With the help of Regional English Language… more »

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers remarks at the signing of the “Declaration of Learning” at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. on January 30, 2013. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Dr. James Billington of the U.S. Library of Congress speaks with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Dr. Vartan Gregorian of the Carnegie Corporation of New York listen at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., January 13, 2012. Secretary Clinton presented President Karzai with a gift from the U.S. Library of Congress and the Carnegie Corporation of New York – a digital copy of the entire body of Afghanistan-related works at the library, as well as a framed copy of a rare manuscript from the collection. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Dr. James Billington of the U.S. Library of Congress speaks with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Dr. Vartan Gregorian of the Carnegie Corporation of New York listen at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., January 13, 2012. Secretary Clinton presented President Karzai with a gift from the U.S. Library of Congress and the Carnegie Corporation of New York – a digital copy of the entire body of Afghanistan-related works at the library, as well as a framed copy of a rare manuscript from the collection. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Afghan Girls Lead Peer Education

Dawn L. McCall, Coordinator of the Bureau of International Information Programs, meets with Afghan teenage girls training themselves in English and leading language classes for their younger peers in the Guzara district outside Herat, Afghanistan, December 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Dawn L. McCall serves as Coordinator of the Bureau of International Information Programs.

The Internet may be important, but it’s not everything. In rural Afghanistan, courageous and talented young women who have never heard of the Internet are using skills today often associated with social media users — initiative, resourcefulness, and social connections — to make tangible contributions to their community.

During a recent visit to the Guzara district outside Herat, near Afghanistan’s western border with Iran, I saw teenage girls training themselves in English and leading language classes for their younger peers. These women worked with the Afghan Women Educational and Professional Improvement Organization, an ambitious organization housed in a sparsely furnished three-room office. This organization provides curriculum planning resources for teachers at a nearby girls’ school, study space for that school’s students, and — as the young, aspiring English… more »