Tune into our Google+ Hangout on Wednesday at 9AM ET on “How Young People Are Transforming the Health World” with Special Adviser Zeenat Rahman and CEO and co-founder of Global Health Corps Barbara Bush.
The Hangout will be broadcast live on the Department of State’s YouTube channel and Google+ page.

Tune into our Google+ Hangout on Wednesday at 9AM ET on “How Young People Are Transforming the Health World” with Special Adviser Zeenat Rahman and CEO and co-founder of Global Health Corps Barbara Bush.

The Hangout will be broadcast live on the Department of State’s YouTube channel and Google+ page.

40 percent of children in Cambodia might not reach their full potential due to a condition referred to as stunting.
Ambassador David Lane discusses education and food security on DipNote
PEPFAR: Ten Years of Saving Millions of Lives
Ten years ago today, the United States Congress, in a remarkable display of compassion and bipartisanship, passed overwhelmingly legislation that established an historic and transforming global health program now known as PEPFAR — the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

At the time that PEPFAR was conceived of and then established during the George W. Bush administration, the world was witnessing first-hand the destruction of an entire generation of individuals in the prime years of their lives and the reversal of remarkable health and development gains, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and to a lesser extent in other developing nations. Rates of new HIV infections were rising rapidly, and hospitals, communities, and families were often too under-resourced and overwhelmed to cope with the enormity of this burden. At that time in 2003, despite the availability of life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in most countries in the developed world, in southern Africa and other regions of the developing world, an HIV diagnosis meant a virtual death sentence, since few had access to such drugs.

Today, as we mark the 10th anniversary of PEPFAR, the situation has changed dramatically. MORE

Supporting Children Is Vital To Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation

Children stand depicting the ribbon, the symbol of AIDS, during a candlelight rally to mark World AIDS Orphans' Day organized in Gauhati, India, May 7, 2007. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and leads the Office of Global Health Diplomacy.

"There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children." — Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa

The impact of HIV and AIDS on children is devastating. To date, an estimated 16 million children have lost one or both parents due to AIDS, 90 percent of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. And despite dramatic advances in treatment this number is not yet declining . In addition, an estimated 3.4 million children under the age of 15 are living with HIV, and millions more children are made vulnerable due to chronically ill parents or the social and economic effects of living in communities with high HIV prevalence.

These numbers clearly demonstrate how vulnerable children are to the social, emotional, economic, and environmental effects that… more »

World Health Day: Meeting the Challenges That Affect Us All

A child is administered polio vaccine in Kolkata, India, Jan. 20, 2013. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and leads the Office of Global Health Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State.

As we recognize World Health Day today, we are reminded that disease knows no borders and that we share a common interest in global health concerns includingseeing a generation without AIDS, ending preventable child deaths, and building and strengthening sustainable health systems to meet the health challenges that affect us all. The U.S. government has been and will continue to be a leading contributor to achieve these goals, and the investment of the American people is having enormous impact

We also know, that as the world reduces the burden of infectious disease and child deaths, new… more »

World Tuberculosis Day: Confronting TB/HIV Co-Infection

A tuberculosis patient takes medicines at Directly Observed Treatment Short-course, run by non-government organization Navirman Samaj Vikas Kendra, on the outskirts of Mumbai, India, Jan. 16, 2012. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Ambassador Eric Goosby serves as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and leads the Office of Global Health Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State.

This Sunday, March 24, is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day. Around the world, countries will mark the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of the bacterium that causes TB. Since the 1980s, this day has also served as a rallying call to raise public awareness and recommit political will toward eliminating the disease. 

Today, TB is the leading cause of death among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa-accounting for 1,000 lives lost each day. Given this enormous human toll, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) continues to address the deadly links between TB and HIV as a top policy and programmatic priority. 

In November 2012,… more »

A New Dawn in Ghana


About the Author: Gene A. Cretz serves as U.S. Ambassador to Ghana.

A new year means new challenges and new opportunities. In my corner of West Africa, both were on display this week. On Monday, January 7, as I drove through the red, yellow, and green clad streets of Accra towards Independence Square, I reflected on how privileged I was to witness history in the making as Ghana’s fourth president of the Fourth Republic was on his way to the Square to be sworn in, after successfully concluding a hard-fought political campaign. Unfortunately, my previous diplomatic postings did not afford me an opportunity to see a peaceful assumption of power after a democratic election.

Witnessing the on-time arrival of dignitaries and convening of the new Parliament alongside a stage full of political leaders from across Africa and notably, Ghana’s former presidents John Kuffour, Jerry Rawlings and former Secretary General Kofi Annan was an unforgettable… more »

Inaugural Caribbean Dialogue on Rule of Law and Gender-Based Violence: A Catalyst for Action

Children play in Kingston, Jamaica, May 30, 2010. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Anita Botti serves as Chief of Staff and Principal Deputy in the Secretary’s Office of Global Women’s Issues.

On the heels of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence (GBV), which ran from November 25 through December 10, the United States engaged with regional partners to spur action against GBV within our own hemisphere. Gender-based violence is a global epidemic that has no boundaries. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, every one of the Caribbean islands has a sexual violence rate that is higher than the world average.

From December 11 to 13, I had the privilege of being part of the first Caribbean Dialogue on Rule of Law and Gender-Based Violence, co-hosted by the Department of State and Florida International University (FIU) in Miami. Approximately 80 representatives from 12 countries of the… more »

Observing World AIDS Day All Year Round

Nguyen Thi Chien interviews a client at a USAID-supported HIV testing and counselling center near Hanoi, April 24, 2009. [USAID photo]

About the Author: David Shear serves as U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam.

Just like many other places around the world, here in Vietnam, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) team is commemorating World AIDS Day on December 1. As a tradition over the past several years, PEPFAR’s public diplomacy outreach takes place through multiple events across Vietnam, ranging from HIV/AIDS awareness concerts, photo exhibits and television shows, to drama performances and movie screenings.

PEPFAR continues to be the cornerstone of the U.S. Mission’s health diplomacy effort to strengthen diplomatic relations with the host government and the Vietnamese people since formal relations resumed in 1995. In Vietnam, people living with HIV/AIDS routinely face significant stigma and discrimination. Injecting drug use is the leading… more »

Using Research To Shape an Effective Response to HIV/AIDS in Swaziland

A relaxed client undergoes adult male circumcision for HIV prevention in a joint Jerusalem AIDS Project - Family Life Association of Swaziland collaborative initiative, 2007, Dr. Inon Schenker/Jerusalem AIDS Project, Courtesy of Photoshare/ PRNewsFoto/Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Makila James serves as U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Swaziland.

World AIDS Day in Swaziland has a particularly profound meaning, as Swaziland has the highest HIV prevalence rate in the world. The recent PEPFAR-supported Swaziland Health Incidence Measurement Survey (SHIMS) — the first such comprehensive survey of its kind on the impact of key HIV prevention programs — indicates that 31 percent of the adult population is living with HIV. It is a staggering number and one that all persons working in the health field in Swaziland has at the forefront of their minds each and every day as they participate in the national fight against the disease. Without a doubt, achieving an AIDS-free generation represents a serious challenge in the Kingdom of Swaziland, but one that we are committed to addressing with our many partners in the country.

The United States government is working… more »