Time to Face Facts

BY JOHN KERRY | APRIL 8, 2013

Three years ago today — April 8, 2010 — President Obama and then-President Dmitry Medvedev signed the New START agreement to reduce American and Russian deployed strategic nuclear forces to their lowest levels since the days when Dwight Eisenhower was president and the Cold War defined our relationship with the Russians.

That December in the Senate, we clawed our way to ratification with 71 votes, a big bipartisan statement that the arms control and nonproliferation consensus could hold together even in a polarized political culture. That statement was reaffirmed by treaty supporters from Henry Kissinger and James Baker — and every other living secretary of state — to President George Herbert Walker Bush. MORE

White House Blog: President Obama Pushes for Nonproliferation
President Barack Obama delivers remarks to the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction symposium (December 3, 2012)

President Barack Obama delivers remarks to the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction symposium held at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C., Dec. 3, 2012. Joing the President on stage are, from left: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta; former Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga.; and Sen. Richard Lugar, R- Ind.(Official White House Photo by Sonya N. Hebert)

On Monday, President Obama traveled to the National Defense University to mark the 20th anniversary of what he called “one of the country’s smartest and most successful national security programs” — the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program for the destruction of weapons of mass destruction in the former Soviet Union.

And after celebrating some of the accomplishments of that program, the President discussed the need to continue that nonproliferation work in the decades ahead.

"We simply cannot allow the 21st century to be darkened by the worst weapons of the 20th century," he said. "And that’s why, over the past four years, we’ve continued to make critical investments in our threat reduction programs -— not just at DOD, but at Energy and at State. In fact, we’ve been increasing funding, and sustaining it. And even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we’re going to keep investing in these programs —- because our national security depends on it." MORE

Ambassador Daniel Benjamin to Present Country Reports on Terrorism 2011

Notice to the Press
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
July 30, 2012


The Department of State will release the annual Congressionally mandated Country Reports on Terrorism 2011 on Tuesday, July 31 at 12:30 p.m. The Bureau of Counterterrorism’s Ambassador at Large, Daniel Benjamin, will provide remarks and respond to reporters’ questions. MORE.

Acting Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security delivers remarks on the Administration’s arms control priorities at the Arms Control Association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on June 4, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Acting Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security delivers remarks on the Administration’s arms control priorities at the Arms Control Association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on June 4, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

South Korea Hosts 2012 Nuclear Security Summit

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak makes opening remarks at the start of a plenary session at the Nuclear Security Summit at the Coex Center, in Seoul, South Korea, March, 27, 2012. [AP Photo]

Today, the Republic of Korea hosted more than 50 world leaders for the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul. During the opening plenary session, President Barack Obamasaid:

"…This gathering is a tribute to the nations that contribute to security and peace that’s playing a leading role around the globe and that’s taking its rightful place on the world stage. When I hosted the first Nuclear Security Summit two years ago in Washington, there were those who questioned whether our nations could summon the will to confront one of the gravest dangers of our time. In part because it involves a lot of technical… more »