Preserving One of the Last and Greatest Ocean Wilderness Areas

A jigsaw puzzle of floating ice extends as far as you can see in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, 2006. [John B. Weller photo, courtesy of The Pew Charitable Trusts]

About the Author: Dr. Kerri-Ann Jones serves as Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.

On March 18, 2013, Secretary of State John Kerry spoke to a packed room of diplomats from around the globe, non-governmental conservation advocates, and others about the urgency of protecting our vast oceans. New Zealand Ambassador to the United States Mike Moore and Australian Foreign Minister Bob Carr, two good friends of the United States and of oceans, joined the Secretary on the podium at this important event.

The Secretary spoke passionately about our connection and responsibility to the oceans as a people and a nation, and how ocean acidification, pollution, and fishing pressure are challenging our ability to sustain the sea and the benefits it provides to us all. You can read and watch his full remarks here.

These threats to the oceans are why the United States… more »

Entrepreneurs from Around the World Engage in GIST Technology-Idea (Tech-I) Competition

Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides meets with young entrepreneurs from the State Department-sponsored Global Innovation through Science and Technology (GIST) initiative on the sidelines of the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, December 12, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Jonathan Margolis serves as Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Science, Space, and Health in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.

Why would 30 young entrepreneurs from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East travel to Dubai for the second annual Global Innovation through Science and Technology (GIST) Initiative Technology Idea (Tech-I) competition? Certainly, the top prize of $25,000 may have had something to do with it, but that was not the only factor. Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides said it best in his keynote speech at the third Global Entrepreneurship Summit. He explained, “Our Global Innovation through Science and Technology program, or GIST, runs start-up boot camps and business plan competitions to spark creativity and inspire young entrepreneurs to pursue their dreams.”

GIST is funded by the U.S. Department of State and implemented in partnership with CRDF Global. It has reached over one million youths with tools and resources to spark new businesses. GIST has trained over 2,500 startups… more »

Conserving Salmon on the High Seas

A Chinook salmon jumps Dagger Falls, Idaho, April 2012. [AP File Photo]












About the Author: Robert C. Jones serves as a Sea Grant Fellow with the Office of Marine Conservation in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.

The conservation and management of wild salmon in the North Pacific Ocean is a priority for the Department of State’s Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs. Many American families rely on fish and other marine resources for their livelihoods; annually, the U.S. commercial fishing industry catches $370 millionworth of salmon and more than 3 million U.S. saltwater recreational anglers fish for salmon in the Pacific northwest region of the United States.


International law generally prohibits fishing for salmon on the high seas (that is, ocean areas beyond the fisheries jurisdiction… more »

Wildlife and Foreign Policy: What’s the Connection?

Under Secretary of State Robert D. Hormats poses for a photograph with members of a wildlife conservancy in Namibia, 2012. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

About the Author: Robert D. Hormats serves as Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton hosted a discussion this morning with foreign diplomats, government officials, civil society leaders, and business representatives on illegal wildlife trafficking and animal conservation. Protection of endangered species such as elephants, rhinos, and tigers do not immediately conjure up images of diplomacy in action. So it’s fair to ask why the Secretary of State is interested in wildlife and convening this high-level meeting. The answer is multifaceted and has broad foreign policy implications.

The U.S. Department of State has a long and proud history in supporting wildlife conservation. In 1916, then-Secretary of State Robert Lansing signed with his British counterpart (representing Canada) a treaty to protect birds that migrate between…more »

Assistant Secretary of State Kerri-Ann Jones to Travel to Thailand and Cambodia

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
September 25, 2012


Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs Dr. Kerri-Ann Jones will travel to Thailand and Cambodia September 25 – October 3.

In Thailand, Dr. Jones will represent the United States at the 3rd East Asia Summit Environment Ministers Meeting. She will meet with officials from the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. She will additionally hold a meeting with the non-governmental organization FREELAND to discuss the illegal trade in wildlife.

In Cambodia, Dr. Jones will discuss wildlife management issues with government officials.

U.S.-New Zealand Joint Commission Meeting on Science and Technology Cooperation

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
September 19, 2012


Dr. Kerri-Ann Jones, Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs and the Honorable Steven Joyce, the New Zealand Minister of Science and Technology, will lead the third U.S.-New Zealand Joint Commission Meeting on Science and Technology Cooperation in Washington, D.C. on September 20, 2012.

The meeting, held under the auspices of the U.S.- New Zealand Science and Technology Agreement, will assess progress on scientific cooperation and identify new areas for scientific collaboration of direct benefit to both countries. Representatives from U.S. Government agencies and research institutions will meet with their New Zealand counterparts to discuss health and health innovation, marine and ocean research, climate change monitoring, research, and services in the Pacific, and natural hazards and resilient cities.

The U.S. and New Zealand are enjoying a period of increased cooperation due in large part to the recent signing of both the Wellington Declaration and the Washington Declaration. The Joint Commission Meeting discussions look to build upon our shared commitment to focus, strengthen, and expand the bilateral science and technology relationship.