Yesterday, President Obama appointed Ambassador Donald Booth as the new U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan.  Learn more about the new ambassador on DipNote!

Yesterday, President Obama appointed Ambassador Donald Booth as the new U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan.  Learn more about the new ambassador on DipNote!

united-nations:

UNICEF has launched new report about female genital mutilation/cutting that looks at data from 29 countries over the past 20 years. Overall, support for the practice is declining - even in countries where FGM/C is widespread, such as Egypt and Sudan.


But there is still work to be done. In a few countries, the proportion of girls and women who want FGM/C to continue has remained constant. 

united-nations:

UNICEF has launched new report about female genital mutilation/cutting that looks at data from 29 countries over the past 20 years. Overall, support for the practice is declining - even in countries where FGM/C is widespread, such as Egypt and Sudan.

A Former Lost Boy on the Path to Becoming a Diplomat
 
I have just checked into my hotel, but find myself staring blankly at rehearsal notes.  I am to be interviewed by a panel of diplomats for the Pickering Fellowship, a fellowship which recruits college students for careers in the Foreign Service.  As I wait for the interview, I wonder to myself, will my education get paid for and will I become a diplomat?  My phone buzzes – texts from my foster mom, sister Hunter, brother Charlie, and friend Mawut, read “good luck.” Read more
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti, as they both attend the 50th anniversary African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on May 25, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti, as they both attend the 50th anniversary African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on May 25, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Ten Years of War in Darfur
Press Statement
Patrick Ventrell
Acting Deputy SpokespersonOffice of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
February 26, 2013

The United States is deeply concerned that, ten years after the outbreak of war in Darfur, the Darfuri people continue to suffer from increased insecurity, human rights abuses, and sexual violence. Brutal conflict among Sudanese Government forces, rebels, and militias, and continued aerial bombardments and indiscriminate attacks on civilian areas by the Sudanese Armed Forces, in violation of UN Security Council Resolutions, have led to the deaths of nearly 300,000 people, the vast majority unarmed civilians. Over two million Darfuris remain internally displaced and as refugees in neighboring countries. Reversing the cycle of violence and impunity requires accountability for the perpetrators.

The United States strongly supports international efforts to bring peace, security, and humanitarian relief to the people of Darfur. We unequivocally support UNAMID, the joint United Nations-African Union peacekeeping force in Darfur, and demand immediate, unimpeded access for peacekeepers and humanitarians throughout Darfur. Over the past decade the United States has provided over $7.5 billion in funding for humanitarian, transition, and peacekeeping assistance for vulnerable populations in Darfur and eastern Chad.

An effective and inclusive political process is urgently needed to avoid another decade of war and to address the crisis of governance that fuels Sudan’s civil wars. We call on the Sudanese Government and all rebel groups to engage without preconditions in such a process, using the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur as a basis to achieve a peaceful resolution to the conflict. The United States remains a committed partner to the people of Darfur, and to all those working for the more peaceful, stable, and prosperous future they deserve.

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, comments on Sudan and South Sudan at the United Nations in New York, New York on January 8, 2012. A text transcript can be found at http://usun.state.gov/briefing/statements/202589.htm

Resolving the Plight of Persecuted, Uprooted People Around the World

Afghan refugee children stand on their belonging loaded on a truck as they depart for Afghanistan at a UNHCR repatriation terminal near Quetta, Pakistan, Nov. 17, 2012. [AP File Photo]

About the Author: Anne C. Richard serves as Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration.

2012 was a challenging year for humanitarians trying to help displaced people around the world. The following summarizes some of the challenges addressed by the State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM) last year.

Inside Syria, 40,000 people have been killed and over two million are displaced. Over half a million people have fled to neighboring countries. The U.S. government (the State Department and USAID) is providing $210 million in humanitarian aid to the region, and this aid is reaching millions.

Last year, refugees fled violence and drought in Northern Mali and… more »

Ambassador Princeton Lyman travels to Juba, South Sudan

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
December 11, 2012


Ambassador Princeton Lyman, U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, travels to Juba, South Sudan today for a series of high-level meetings with government officials, members of civil society, and representatives of international organizations working in South Sudan.

Ambassador Lyman’s visit comes at a critical time in the delayed implementation of the historic agreements between Sudan and South Sudan signed on September 27. The Sudanese and South Sudanese people deserve swift and complete implementation of these agreements, as called for by the AU Peace and Security Council in its October 24 communiqué.

Special Envoy Lyman will engage South Sudan on the resolution of outstanding issues, such as the disputed area of Abyei, and the implementation of the crucial agreements, including the creation of the safe demilitarized border zone and the resumption of oil production between the two countries. Special Envoy Lyman will also underscore the United States’ commitment to supporting South Sudan’s economic development and growth as a full-fledged democracy that respects human rights and the rule of law.

Following his visit to South Sudan, Special Envoy Lyman will proceed to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to attend the meeting of the Joint Political and Security Mechanism being convened by the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel Chairman Thabo Mbeki.

The White House recently announced that Ambassador Lyman will step down in the new year as U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan after two years of service, notably marked by helping to shepherd the creation of an independent South Sudan. Special Envoy Lyman will serve in his position until the President names a new envoy.

For further information, please contact Erin Rattazzi at RattazziEA@state.gov, 202-736-7043

Renewal of Sudan National Emergency

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
November 2, 2012


Yesterday the President renewed the national emergency in Executive Order 13067, on the basis of which the United States has imposed economic sanctions with respect to Sudan since 1997. U.S. law requires that a decision be made regarding the renewal of the national emergency each year by the anniversary of the national emergency.

In recent years, Sudan has made progress in resolving a number of outstanding issues with South Sudan, which contributes significantly to the prospects for peace between the two countries. However, the ongoing conflict in Southern Kordofan, Blue Nile, and Darfur continue to threaten regional stability, and the human rights and humanitarian crises there – including the lack of humanitarian access – are very serious. Outstanding issues with South Sudan, such as the final status of Abyei, also pose such a threat. Addressing these concerns is necessary for a peaceful Sudan and would enable the United States and Sudan to move towards a normalized relationship.

We will continue our dialogue with the Government of Sudan on the steps that are necessary to improve our bilateral relationship.

Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, on the Agreements between Sudan and South Sudan

Susan E. Rice
U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
U.S. Mission to the United Nations
New York, NY
September 27, 2012


We welcome the important agreements signed today between Sudan and South Sudan. The understandings reached on security, oil, financial, nationality and trade issues testify to courageous leadership on both sides and skilled diplomacy by President Thabo Mbeki and the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel. Just a few months ago, Sudan and South Sudan were on the brink of war. Today’s agreements demonstrate the impact that strong, united action by the UN Security Council can have on some of the world’s most challenging situations. The Security Council’s adoption of resolution 2046, endorsing the AU Roadmap and setting forth clear obligations on both sides, helped to chart a path out of conflict.

If implemented swiftly and effectively, these agreements will bring enormous benefits to people in both Sudan and South Sudan, lay a foundation for resolution of the remaining issues, and promote lasting peace. The grave humanitarian crises in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile are unacceptable, and it is imperative that Sudan grant immediate and unhindered humanitarian access to help those in desperate need. We have seen before that the situation in the Two Areas and along the border can unravel efforts to chart a brighter future for both sides. All concerned must build on today’s historic step to fulfill the promise of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and resolve the final status of the disputed border area of Abyei.