Yesterday, National Security Advisor Susan Rice spoke from the New America Foundation to explain why Syria’s use of chemical weapons is a serious threat to our national security, and why it is in our national interest to undertake limited military action to deter future use. Read more on DipNote at http://go.usa.gov/DZNx.

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, comments on Sudan and South Sudan at the United Nations in New York, New York on January 8, 2012. A text transcript can be found at http://usun.state.gov/briefing/statements/202589.htm

Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, on the Agreements between Sudan and South Sudan

Susan E. Rice
U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
U.S. Mission to the United Nations
New York, NY
September 27, 2012


We welcome the important agreements signed today between Sudan and South Sudan. The understandings reached on security, oil, financial, nationality and trade issues testify to courageous leadership on both sides and skilled diplomacy by President Thabo Mbeki and the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel. Just a few months ago, Sudan and South Sudan were on the brink of war. Today’s agreements demonstrate the impact that strong, united action by the UN Security Council can have on some of the world’s most challenging situations. The Security Council’s adoption of resolution 2046, endorsing the AU Roadmap and setting forth clear obligations on both sides, helped to chart a path out of conflict.

If implemented swiftly and effectively, these agreements will bring enormous benefits to people in both Sudan and South Sudan, lay a foundation for resolution of the remaining issues, and promote lasting peace. The grave humanitarian crises in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile are unacceptable, and it is imperative that Sudan grant immediate and unhindered humanitarian access to help those in desperate need. We have seen before that the situation in the Two Areas and along the border can unravel efforts to chart a brighter future for both sides. All concerned must build on today’s historic step to fulfill the promise of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and resolve the final status of the disputed border area of Abyei.

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, delivers remarks on Sudan and South Sudan at the United Nations in New York, New York on September 7, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, comments on Syria at a Security Council Stakeout at the United Nations in New York, New York on June 8, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, comments on Syria at the United Nations in New York, New York on May 30, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Watch Live: Ambassador Rice Discusses Foreign Policy in a Google+ Hangout

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice speaks to reporters after a Security Council meeting on March 16, 2011, at UN headquarters in New York. [AP File Photo]

Today, join Ambassador Susan E. Rice and New York Times columnist Nicholas D. Kristof as they break ground on the frontier of social media and U.S. foreign policy. In a live Google+ Hangout, Ambassador Rice and Mr. Kristof will discuss the world’s most pressing challenges and America’s role in an increasingly interconnected world. They will be joined live by a selection of citizens who will ask questions from the U.S. and overseas. 

Watch the conversation live at 2:30 p.m. EST on The Times’s homepage or on the New York Times Google+ page, and join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag…more »

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, comments on Syria at the United Nations in New York, New York on May 8, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]

Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, on World Press Freedom Day

Susan E. Rice
U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
U.S. Mission to the United Nations
New York, NY
May 3, 2012


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

On World Press Freedom Day, we salute the world’s journalists and honor all who serve the cause of press freedom—particularly those who do so at great risk.

The right to free expression is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, reinforced by a range of international treaties, and written into numerous national constitutions. In July 2011, a Syrian non-governmental organization earned consultative status in the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations for its work on the issue, underscoring the regard held by the international community for all who labor to protect this fundamental human right.

Today, the organization’s founder is languishing behind bars. Mazen Darwish’s arrest on February 16 without charge or trial—and continuing detention by the Syrian government in solitary confinement—should inflame the conscience of all decent people. It should also be far less common. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, 179 journalists were jailed worldwide as of last December. Already in 2012, 17 have been killed simply for being journalists, six of them in Syria—including the veteran American reporter, Marie Colvin.

Earlier this year, President Obama said, “When universal human rights are denied, when the independence of judiciaries or legislatures or the press is threatened, we will speak out.” Today, we raise our voices for all who risk their lives for the idea that no one should be silenced.

Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, delivers remarks on the conflict between Sudan and South Sudan to the United Nations Security Council in New York, New York on May 2, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript.]